M. Cházaro B.

Creator(s):
  • Field Museum of Natural History - Botany Department
  • Field Museum of Natural History - Botany Department
Creator role(s):
  • Creator
  • Creator
  • Spondias mombin L., M. Cházaro B. 00923, F
    Creator: Field Museum of Natural History - Botany Department
    [Copyright] Field Museum of Natural History - CC BY-NC
    Description: Spondias mombin L., M. Cházaro B. 00923, F
  • Spondias mombin L., M. Cházaro B. 00923, F
    Creator: Field Museum of Natural History - Botany Department
    [Copyright] Field Museum of Natural History - CC BY-NC
    Description: Spondias mombin L., M. Cházaro B. 00923, F
Current Determination: Spondias mombin L.
Family: Anacardiaceae
Location: Mexico: Veracruz
Locality: Coatepec, Por Tuzamapan
Coordinates: 19.45 -96.87
Elevation: 1000

Collector(s): M. Cházaro B.
Collection Date: 10 July 1978
Description: Uses: Eaten, sold, or used to feed pigs; bark made into tea for stomach ache and diarrhea; decoction is also made for bathing sufferers from pasmo and from heatstroke (Anderson et al. 2003:104-105). En medicina para infecciones de encías, infecciones de intestinos y vejiga [Roys, 1931]; el fruto es comestible, es maderable y melífera (nectarífera) (Arellano et al. 2003:28). An astringent tea is used for diarrhea, gonorrhea, sore throat, or gonorrhea ; as a bath for stubborn sores, rashes, and painful insect stings, and for pregnant women who feel weak and tired beyond the first trimester; For headaches and fever, the leaves are mashed in a little alcohol and placed on the forehead which is then wrapped for the night (Arvigo and Balick 1998:125). Edible (Atran 1993 647) Food, ornamentation, construction material, beverage, medicinal, miscellaneous products (Balick et al. 2000:117). Common Names: Abal, k'an abal, jujuub (Anderson et al. 2003:300). K'aan abal, k'iinil k'inil abal, k'iinil, xk'iinil, ciruela amarilla, jobo [Barrera, 1976]; k'aan abal, abalil k'aax jobo espinoso, jobo roñoso (Tab), mombi, pompana, papocua [Martinez, 1979]; ciruela de cochino, ciruela de monte, ciruela morada (Oax); ciruela del país (Jal), costicoxocotl, fundura, hobo (Ver, Sin), hondura, jabo, jondura, lului, lulushotz (Chis), ojo de zopilote, pompocua (Mich), sahuati-lotorosimo (Sin), shipa (Ver), Tu-Tuni (Oax) [Martinez, 1979] (Arellano et al. 2003:27). Jobo, puk, rum-p'ok (Arvigo and Balick 1998:125). Hogplum, jocote, job'o, juju (Atran 1993:647). Ciruela cochino, hog plumb, jobo, kanabal, pok (Balick et al. 2000:117).
Catalog Subset: Economic Botany
Catalog Project: Mesoamerican Ethnobotany
EMu IRN: 2967431
OccurenceID: ff35bc50-544c-4c60-bdec-ddb8f32f3f73

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